Lifting lockdown has been a subject on people’s minds here in the UK for the last 7 weeks. We all know that eveything has to end. As much as most of us were concerned about the impact on our lives of going into lockdown, I think for the most part we have all adjusted, to some degree, to this new reality we are living in. 

Parents are juggling working from home and helping their children with school work. We all know that there is no such thing as “popping” to the shops now, because we may be standing in a socially distanced queue for anything up to an hour and a half. We dutifully take our hours exercise on our bikes or walking in the vicinity of our homes. 

We miss our families and friends, but to a degree at least, lockdown is our new normal.

At some point though, this will have to change. It already is. This week, more people have been advised that they can return to work and we were given a timeframe for certain age ranges returning to school.

Lifting Lockdown

With the announcement this week form the government here in the UK that our youngest children will be among the first returning to school, many are feeling understandably anxious about how this will work in a school environment.

Children aged 4 and 5 years have no concept of personal space, let alone social distancing so many Heads and leadership teams are scratching their heads at the moment and many parents are concerned for the ramifications this may have.

Teddy in a Mask

 No PPE is going to be supplied to schools. Honestly, can you imagine it being of any benefit with such young children anyway? There will just be lots of hand washing, cleaning of surfaces and equipment and social distancing, as far as possible. It is all very scary and different for everyone involved. 

How can we help our children adjust to this “post-lockdown” reality? 

Well, I think it is important to start talking to them now. 

Talk to them about how things will have to be different

Explain that they will not be able to hug their friends or hold hands.

If you haven’t already make sure you really hammer home that they must cough and sneeze into their elbow. They must wash their hands regularly and throw tissues away straight after use (somewhere safe like a dustbin, not tucked behind the nearest item of furniture!).  

As far as you can prepare them for what school will be like when they return. The fact they may be in a different classroom, have a different teacher and not all their class will be together. Explain that lunch times and play times will be different. 

It’s hard because none of us really know how this is going to work yet. But the more we can prepare them for the fact that going back to school doesn’t mean, walking back in and picking up where they left off, the better. 

Build up their immune system

Having a strong immune system is going to be vital over the coming months. Just by being isolated from the rest of the world for a few weeks our body will have relaxed it’s natural systems a little. Make sure you are eating healthily as a family. Lots of green veg and broccoli in particular is great for lung strength. Get some vitamin c and zinc or if you are able to take it echinacea. These are all great for boosting your immune system. You can get vitamin c and zinc in soluble tablets that taste like orange pop, really easy to get most children to drink. 

Stay calm

I know it’s hard. Children pick up on you being anxious about things and they assume (rightly sometimes) that there is reason for them to be scared. When we are scared our immunity is reduced so at the moment, more than ever it is important to stay calm. Do breathing exercises together, meditate if that is something you are able to do, make sure you are getting exercise every day (that helps your body to process any stress and anxiety you may be experiencing). Have a look at some of my free resources for ideas.

Play

Play is how children, especially young children, make sense of the world. Play at going back to school. Pretend that you can’t get too close to each other, make it a game. Make hand washing a game. Use teddy bears and dolls to help them get used to the idea of staying a distance away from each other. Enjoy this time together. It may feel stressful at times, but having all this extra time with our children is really special. (It has been suggested that there should be more focus on play in schools when this is over too. To read more check out this article from The Guardian.)

Sleep

 Getting enough sleep will ensure that you are able to think clearly and rationally and help you stay calm. It is also important to get enough sleep as it helps your body process stress related hormones such as cortisol and adrenaline.

Hugs

During lockdown there aren’t many people we are allowed to hug, but we can hug our children and we must do it often! Hugs release feel good chemicals that help us feel safe, secure and content and that is more important now than ever.

Lockdown Limits

As we prepare to begin a slow and complex return to normality it is normal to have very mixed feelings about all this. It is normal to be scared for ourselves and for our children. Many people are confused and emotional at the moment, for many reasons. As parents we want our children to return to their “normal” lives, to play with their friends and continue their education. It isn’t easy for anyone. As adults we are concerned about the physical and mental health of our loved ones, we might be worried about finances if we are unable to work. We want our children to stay up to date with their learning, but equally we want them to be happy and healthy when all this is over.

One thing is for certain, life will have to return to normal at some point. When that will be, none of us really know. We are all very much in the hands of the government, the scientists and other experts right now. I urge you though, listen to your instincts. As parents we have strong intuition when it comes to the wellbeing and safety of our children. If you feel that your child is perhaps more at risk, or others in your household are, if you feel that they will be upset by the necessary changes that will inevitably have to happen in school before they return, talk to school. Explain how you are feeling, explain your situation but ultimately do what you believe is right for your child.

 

Lockdown or no lockdown I can help!

If you are concerned about how this pandemic has affected the mental wellbeing of your children, or the children in your school, please do get in touch. As soon as I am able to safely I will be back visiting schools, running workshops and teaching both teachers and their precious students how to reduce the anxiety they have been feeling and giving them tools to stabilise their mental and physical health. If you would like to discuss this with me by all means get in touch.

 

 

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